There once was a grand, but lonely window that needed a home. Even though, this lonely window was stunning and strong, like most things it could not stand alone. This made the window sad . . . all it wanted to do was simply brighten a room and have a place to call home. 


Because the window was so grand it could not be in just any room. The room had to be an epic, strong room to support the weight of the window.  


Now you see, the window was foolish and just couldn’t understand why he of all windows, couldn’t just be a window and let the sun shine through. After all he was big, strong, and a glorious window in size, all by  himself. 

Why would he, of all windows, be left in a dark, dusty room? 



But a wiser man, known as the Visionary, knew that nothing could stand alone. The Visionary knew, everything worth something needed support.  This wise but simple lesson the Visionary not only lived, he taught his whole life through


So the window waited. . . in a dark, dreary and dusty cell like room. 


                      
  And it waited, 

                                               and it waited, 

                                                                                               and it waited. 

Until one day the Visionary‘s son and his wife had a dream to remodel their home. In this special dream, the pair wanted the window to have a special place of his own. For they too thought the window was grand.  This made the window very happy. He wanted to move in right away. 

But, he couldn’t. 


Everyone but the window knew these things take time. 



First of all: a window like this needed a large frame and strong walls for support. But, before frames and walls could be built, all dreams have to dreamed. Then of course, those dreams have to be formed into plans. Plans have to be drafted and drafted and drafted again. And this, much to the window’s disappointment, would take a very, very long time. 



One day, as the Visionary was growing weak, his son , the Craftsman, went to his father and told his father all about about this grand and lovely window. The son told his father he wanted the window to live with him and where he had dreamed the window would be. 


Now the story goes, before the visionary closed his eyes and bid farewell, he set right to work and he gave as only he could give ~  by: teaching, listening and dreaming the dreams of other dreamers. And most importantly, for the window, the son, and that moment in time, the Visionary did what he always did ~ he carefully and most lovingly, placed all those dreams onto paper.  . . so the dreams of all the dreamers could become reality through the hands of his first born son, “the Craftsman


And though it took time. . . the window grew impatient. He wanted what he wanted ~ and he wanted it all to be done right away. Sadly, the Window didn’t know the Visionary had gone. 

So for a moment, more time stood still. 


Until the Craftsman picked up the plans  again that his father had so lovingly and carefully drawn. With a heavy heart, the son decided he must carry on. 


Even though the Visionary had gone, his spirit remains close by. This we know is true, because, the Visionary’s first born son was wise, like his father.  He knew better then the window. The Craftsman knew, from the lessons of his father, the foolish window must have a strong foundation, good support and the perfect plan to stand strong.  

There was so, so much to do.  To the window, the work seemed to last forever.

and then . . .at long last! 


The young, strong, proud walls ~ the old, wise, steady bricks from the mill, now stood ready to support the foolish, impatient but lovely window. 


Even though the house was not finished, the window rejoiced ~ for he was finally out of that dark and dreary room.  The window had a place to shine.     A place to finally call home. 

Once again. . . Not the End


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12 thoughts on “the foolish Window

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